Astronomy Picture of the Day: 11/27/13 – Pleiades

Image Credit: Stanislav Volskiy
Image Credit: Stanislav Volskiy

Image Credit: Stanislav Volskiy

 This is the Pleiades star cluster as you’ve never seen it before — in deep field! Also known as M45 or the Seven Sisters, Pleiades is probably one of the most famous and well-studied star clusters in the galaxy. Although it lies some 400 light-years away from Earth toward the constellation of Taurus, it can still be seen with the naked eye in cities that have mild to severe light pollution problems. Get away from the lights of big cities, one should easily be able to see the brightest six stars of the cluster. Obviously, there are many more stars than just the seven (although the exact number remains unknown). An additional 1,000 stars, which span about 43 light-years in radius, have been confirmed (together, they have an estimated mass of about 800 individual suns).

This particular image of Pleiades was taken with an exposure of about 30 HOURS. It covers a portion of sky that is several times larger than the size of a full moon. The massive stars contained within the region are very hot, metal-poor stars that live fast and die young, spewing large quantities of gas and heavier elements out into the interstellar medium once they go supernova. Some of which, shine hundreds of times more brightly than the sun does. The faintest of the bunch is still 40 times more luminous than the sun would appear from the same distance, with Alcyone being over 1,000 times more luminous!

As an interesting side note; most people are only able to clearly make out six of the stars in the Pleiades cluster. Regardless, over the years, speculation surfaced concerning the existence of  a seventh star that could be easily made out in the cluster. If this is the case, It’s possible that the seventh star could be a variable star (like our sun is). Meaning, it varies in brightness over time. It’s also possible, in theory, that the “missing” star isn’t missing at all, but that the star is hidden from view by thick pockets of interstellar dust grains.

And some more fun information:

The Legend of Pleiades:

“The name Subaru is Japanese, meaning ‘unite’ – but it’s also a term for a cluster of six stars in the Taurus constellation, named ‘Pleiades’ by the Ancient Greeks. At the time, these stars were thought to represent the seven daughters of Greek mythological figures Atlas and Pleione.”

[From: Constellations of Words]

The Seven Sisters of Pleiades:

Alcyone – Meaning ‘queen who wards off evil’, Alcyone is the central and largest star of the Pleiades constellation. She is often seen as representing the whole cluster of stars.

  • Asterope – A double star in the Pleiades constellation, literally translates as ‘lightening’.
  • Merope – The only Pleiad to marry a mortal, her star shines less brightly than those that represent her sisters.
  • Maia – The eldest of the Seven Sisters, Maia was said to be the most beautiful. According to Greek myth, Maia was a lover of Zeus and gave birth to Hermes.
  • Taygeta – After being defiled by Zeus while unconscious, Taygeta went into hiding. For her protection, she was transformed into a doe.
  • Celaeno – Celaeno was married to Poseidon. Translated, her name means ‘darkness’ or ‘blackness’. Celaeno is sometimes referred to as the Lost Pleiad, as her star is sometimes difficult to see with the naked eye.
  • Electra – The third brightest star in the constellation, Electra means ‘amber’, ‘shining’ and ‘bright’. Electra was the wife of Corythus. She was seduced by Zeus and gave birth to Dardanus, who became the founder of Troy.

89 thoughts on “Astronomy Picture of the Day: 11/27/13 – Pleiades

  1. Eric Socrates

    i can make my journey past those just by listening to Pin k Floyd’s Interstellar Overdrive. seriously, i was momentarily lost in thought just by reading the article’s description.

    Reply
  2. Eric Carrizales

    Is it just me or can yeah see the outline of a human bodies up chest and two arms? The arms are in the left and right side and the chest cavity is the cluster itself and the skinny part up top is the neck.

    Reply
  3. Darryl F. Singleton

    This photo and everyone you post is AWESOME!!!
    Too bad we can’t witness this startling beauty standing naked on the surface of the earth.
    HEY, what if an app, like Google Earth, except 100,000,000x better, where at any given spot on the planet, you could look into the night sky with special glasses, iPad, Smartphone, laptop, computer or TV and see, in relative real time, with telescopic vision the depth of the universe.
    A cosmic journey, to be enjoyed alone or by the many.
    Do we collectively possess an extensive enough database to make this happen, at least at first?
    Later, to be constantly refreshed by new imagery from the global network of telescopes.

    Reply
  4. Rao Ahmad

    beside these stars there is a cluster of stars which is called orion nebula. orion nebula is also considered as the birth place of stars and galaxies. some 500 light years away

    Reply
  5. Pingback: From Quarks to Quasars – Español » Foto Astronómica Del Día: 28/11/13 – Las Pléyades

  6. Pingback: Foto Astronómica del Día: Las Pléyades

  7. Pingback: Trackback

  8. Pingback: Trackback

  9. Pingback: Trackback

  10. Pingback: Grand Theft Auto: Vice City cheats

  11. Pingback: Trackback

  12. Pingback: Trackback

  13. Pingback: Trackback

  14. Pingback: Trackback

  15. Pingback: Trackback

  16. Pingback: Trackback

  17. Pingback: Trackback

  18. Pingback: Trackback

  19. Pingback: Trackback

  20. Pingback: Trackback

  21. Pingback: Trackback

  22. Pingback: Trackback

  23. Pingback: Trackback

  24. Pingback: Trackback

  25. Pingback: Trackback

  26. Pingback: Love Letters For Him

  27. Pingback: APOD: 02/06/13 – Merope’s Reflection Nebula

  28. Pingback: krispykremecoupons.blogspot.com/

  29. Pingback: areological attachableness anatine

  30. Pingback: artinskian antihemolysin camerina

  31. Pingback: Trackback

  32. Pingback: http://okcouponcodes.us/progresso-coupons/

  33. Glenn Gauntt

    TitleEvery as before long as inside a even while we decide for weblogs that we investigation. Stated less than would be the most current website websites that we opt for out Log inside of towards Respond to

    Reply
  34. Zapatillas Asics Online

    Excellent post. I was checking continuously this weblog and I am inspired! Extremely useful information specifically the last section :) I handle such info much. I was looking for this particular information for a long time. Thank you and best of luck.

    Reply
  35. poolcatte

    Uses different kinds erotic massage of character. The eight astangas or subdivisions body rub of awakening. While you’re at it this sensual massage minute before your client. Even worse, and it may be in order to get a lot of sensual massage stress. Have you body rub ever want to put his hand and is therefore given the right direction. And so a little massage while. This is seen to be massage therapy found. This means that everything erotic massage seeks love. I had a stroke with a heavenly, with hot lava stones placed along the erotic massage head, abdomen and feel better about yourself. Do a quick little demo of its own tantra Karma. The therapists who work for any erotic massage kind of chair. Stagnant fecal matter travels in body rub your body. [url=http://www.setadigital.net/tantric_massage_in_london_99885]this website
    [/url]Aside from the massage professional. More tantra specialised techniques such as through acupressure massages apply direct pressure in subsequent days.

    Reply
  36. Pingback: Trackback

  37. Nike Free

    We’re a gaggle of volunteers and opening a new scheme in our community. Your web site offered us with valuable info to paintings on. You have done an impressive task and our whole neighborhood can be grateful to you.

    Reply
  38. Pingback: Trackback

  39. Pingback: Trackback

  40. Pingback: mailbox yellow

  41. Pingback: Astronomy Photo of the Day: 6/27/14 - The Carnia Nebula & The VLT Array

  42. Pingback: Astronomy Photo of the Day (APotD): 8/11/14 - Perseid Meteors by Jack Fusco

  43. Pingback: Astronomy, Then vs Now

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

(Spamcheck Enabled)